If I could do it for them … Motivation the dark side

I will admit to something . I have gained a bit of weight in the last months of 2014. Part of it was the simple good food of it all , part of it was me being away from home and dealing with a mad stressful situation and part of it was nothing is harder than working out in the cold when you are already unmotivated by circumstances. so now the 10 lbs I was trying to lose has risen to 25.

I have had a hard time motivating myself . I have the a fitbit and a Jawbone UP24 ( yes I have them both) and I invite people to add me to their teams because competition does help me but that does not help with the other thing. The other thing is eating , specifically boredom eating. I look at women with tiny tight bodies and think I can do this then I am confronted with fudgy brownies and I decide that it is overrated and unfeminine to be muscular. in other words I fill my self with crap . literally and figuratively ..sorry.

I then thought about the times when I lost a great deal of weight . the first was when I was 26 and lost 60 lbs in about 4 months. yes. 4 months. How? How did I do this feat of magic that left people that had seen me in month one scratching their heads at month 4 ?  it was hate. yes. the most toxic thing ever . HATE. I found out that my ex was a cheater and a liar ( both things are exclusive) and I decided that I had to be so hot that he would want to kill himself over me. it backfired because he actually kidnapped me and trying to force me into a marriage because hate is a bad thing but the point i started with was that I did lose 60 lbs in 4 months.

The second time was spite. I had lost weight and had gone from a size 16 to a 10 and someone asked me if I was a size 20! A FUCKING 20!  So I immediately lost an additional 20 lbs and landed in a size 4. take that bitch!

So i thought about those things and realized that I am not a difficult motivation person I just need something that makes me dig my heels in . and this time I decided that if I can do these things , that I have to stop saying that I am unmotivated. I am very motivated. and If I can do these things for hate and spite I can do them for me. I can decide that I love myself as much as I hated my lying cheating EX and the woman at the store. Here is some of my tricks .

  1. Mantra ; yes it is hokey. It is also effective.”If I could do it for them I can do it for me”  has  stopped me from diving head long into late night eating more than once.
  2. substitution. I have to say this , JIMACA IS NOT FRENCH FRIES!!! If one more website suggests that I eat a sliced Jimaca when I want fries I will scream. That having been said if you must eat having something friendly to eat is helpful. like olives or pickles.
  3. affirmations . Mantra’s bigger hokier brother but again effective. a nice lively round of ” I is good , I is smart , I is important ” really does help you not to finish off a pound of … well a pound of anything really. eat by the pound can’t be healthy.

These have been my things to replace the whole hate/spite thing and so far it has helped me tremendously.

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Big Duh #1-Cut Calories to Lose Weight

When I lost weight , The number one question that I got was ” what’s the secret?” and I would watch my friends and family members with their little hungry eyes waiting fro me to do a Dr. Oz and give them the miracle cure. honestly, I wish I had one. I wish there was some easy formula that I could call upon to drop weight. I wish that I could say ” I really need to lose this last 20 lbs I better start eating ___” . I can say that protein helps. I can say that stopping snacking just to do it will help. I can say that eating 3 meals a day , no more , made me drop fast.

Cut 100 Calories a Day — Lose 10 Pounds a Year

The last thing you want to do right about now is go on a diet. (Okay, it’s pretty much the last thing you want to do ever.) Luckily you can zap the bulge without resorting to rabbit food. The trick: Eat just a little less. Scientists at Harvard and Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge found that people who lowered their c

Flourless chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream

Flourless chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

alorie intake lost an average of 13 pounds in six months no matter what kind of diet they were on. \”This is the best weight-loss news in a long time,” says Frank Sacks, MD, nutrition professor at Harvard School of Public Health and lead author of the study.”If you don’t like what you’re eating, you’re not going to stick with it. These findings give you flexibility to trim a bit here and there and still enjoy your favorites.”

In fact, by nixing just 100 calories a day, you’ll lose more than 10 pounds a year. Up your cuts to 250 and you’re down 26 pounds. Want to lose faster? Ditch 500 calories daily and you’ll drop those pounds in half the time. We found 50 so-easy ways for you to trim a little but save a lot.

Cut 100 Calories at Breakfast

Use skim milk in place of flavored Coffee-mate in your two morning mugs.

Eat a bowl of high-fiber cereal and you’ll consume fewer calories all day.

Order bacon, not sausage, with your eggs.

Choose a yeast doughnut instead of a denser cake one.

Cut 100 Calories at Lunch

Use 1 tablespoon of mayo and 1 tablespoon of low-fat cottage cheese to make tuna salad.

Put barbecue sauce, not honey mustard, on your chicken sandwich at Wendy’s.

Top your burger with onions, lettuce, and tomato and skip the cheese.

Ask for the 12-ounce child-size soda instead of the 21-ounce medium at the drive-through.

Slim down your sandwich by using Arnold Select 100% Whole Wheat Sandwich Thins instead of whole wheat bread.

Toss your salad with 1 tablespoon of dressing until every lettuce leaf is coated. You’ll get away with using half the usual serving size. Try this trick at dinner too.

Skip the crackers and shredded cheese on your chili.

Cut 100 Calories at Dinner

Trade butter for a flavorful spread made with garlic, fresh rosemary, and light, trans fat-free margarine.

Making meatballs? Mix half the amount of ground beef the recipe calls for with half as much cooked brown rice.

Instead of two slices of medium pepperoni pan pizza, choose thin-crust.

When munching on chicken wings, don’t toss the bones midway through. Seeing the evidence of your feast may help you eat less, studies show.

Cut 100 Calories from a Snack

Trade 1/2 cup of premium vanilla ice cream for 1/2 cup of Breyers Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough ice cream.

Ordering a cone? Make it the sugar, not the waffle, kind.

Munch on Pirate’s Booty. In a study, switching to an air-puffed cheesy snack twice a day saved about 70 calories a pop.

Grab a Dannon Light & Fit yogurt, not a low-fat fruit blend.

Replace half the butter in cake, muffin, and brownie recipes with an equal amount of applesauce or mashed bananas. You’ll save about 100 calories for every tablespoon you swap.

Indulge in a slice of angel food cake drizzled with chocolate syrup rather than three cookies.

via Cut Calories to Lose Weight — 41 Calorie-Cutting Tricks.

Health

Health (Photo credit: Tax Credits)

Are you sabatoging your weightloss?

Beachbody

Beachbody (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you just started an exercise plan or are getting your butt in gear by working out more consistently, you may need to change how you fuel your body to get the most out of it. Common nutrition mistakes such as drinking your calories or eating too much post workout may be the reason why you can’t lose weight (or inches) even though you’re giving it your all. Although getting fit isn’t just about the scale, it’s still an important factor, so we’ll break down 5 common problems—and how to fix them—to get you back on the path to results

Woman eating an Apple

Problem 1: You have no idea how many calories you’re really eating

It’s common to think more exercise = more calories. But if you’re trying to lose weight, you may be adding on as many calories as you’re burning—or more. “Think about the food that you’re eating to fuel your workouts and ask yourself how it fits into your total calorie allotment for the day,” advises Felicia Stoler, MS, RD, a nutritionist and exercise physiologist. Just because you hit the cardio hard today doesn’t automatically mean you can supersize dinner. “Most people have no idea how much they’re really eating.” To get honest with yourself about your calorie needs, write down everything you eat for a day (yes, even that handful of nuts you’re holding right now) or use a site like MyFitnessPal®. You’ll probably be surprised by your final number.

Problem 2: You’re hydrating with a sports drink

Man Drinking Sports Drink If you’re doing a hard, prolonged workout, then hydrating with a sports drink can be a good thing, but for your standard, at-home program, you’re usually better off with water. Sports drinks contain about 50 calories per 8 oz., and 14 grams of sugar (about 3.5 teaspoons). Your body will probably burn though that in an hour-long workout, but then you won’t be mobilizing fat stores as much. As for the electrolytes, yes, an hour-long program depletes them, but it’s nothing a good recovery drink can’t fix.

Problem 3: You’re addicted to that preworkout snack

As long as they’re getting enough balanced calories in their diet, the average person should have all the glycogen stores they need to get through an hour-long workout, even first thing in the morning. Eating something beforehand might give your performance a little boost, but if you skip it you’re better off—teaching your body how to mobilize fat stores for energy (just like in Problem 2). The exception to this is if you “bonk” or run out of glycogen and blood sugar partway through your workout. When this happens, you don’t just feel a little pooped; you feel as though you’ve just run into a brick wall. If this happens, 50–100 calories of simple carbs, 10 minutes before you start, should fix it. Half a banana would be ideal. If you’re looking for a boost with minimal calories, Beachbody‘s E&E Energy and Endurance® Formula or a strong cup of coffee are two great ergogenic aids.

Via Team Beachbody

 

 – Newsletters.

Mistakes You’re Making at the Salad Bar

Carbohydrates/Sugars/Starches

 (Photo credit: sweetbeetandgreenbean)

You can breathe a sigh of relief. We’re going to spare you the lecture filled with impractical “rules” for what you should or shouldn’t eat at the salad bar. Instead, we’re going to level with you about how to refine a few of your salad bar habits with some practical tips.

Cobb Salad

Don’t worry, that doesn’t include discussing table napkin etiquette or a brief history of the salad fork (that’s the smaller, shorter fork, by the way). But it does include tips for how you can eat the foods you want while keeping your diet in check.

Mistake #1: You Don’t Realize Salad Isn’t “Free”

You might avoid the iceberg and head straight for romaine, kale, spinach, and mixed greens, but it doesn’t take much to ruin what could be a healthy meal. Calorie-dense add-ons like shredded cheese, pasta, or those crunchy sesame noodles won’t cause your spare tire to inflate . . . if you are mindful that they are much higher in calories than nutrient-packed veggies like cucumbers and peppers, or fruits like apricots and tomatoes.

Mistake #2: You Eat Too Much “Good” Fat

Greek SaladFats are essential. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in salmon, eggs, olive oil, avocados, and nuts can help fight disease and regulate cholesterol levels. But an ounce of fat also contains more than twice as many calories as an ounce of carbohydrates or protein, so a truck-sized load of “good” fat on your plate still spells bad news for your gut.

Don’t avoid fats entirely. Just don’t pile them on. Use the thumb rule. When you’re adding a serving of a fatty food, use about a thumb’s worth. Generally, you don’t need more than two thumbs’ worth of fat on a salad, so maybe a wedge of avocado and a small spoonful of chopped nuts. (And you thought thumbs were just for rating movies.)

Mistake #3: Your Plate is Monochromatic

No need to hit every shade on the color wheel, but a hodgepodge of reds, oranges, yellows, and greens does more than pretty up your salad; it adds variety to your diet and delivers a variety of essential nutrients—particularly phytonutrients, which are unique to fruits and veggies—when consumed.

“Darker color veggies like broccoli, spinach, peppers, and carrots have the most nutritional value,” explains Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD, about phytonutrients. “But each color—red cranberries, white onions, orange carrots, green peppers—has different antioxidant properties and different ways to protect against things like cancer or heart disease.”

Since variables like your sex, age, and how active you are determine how many fruits and vegetables you should consume per day, let this plug-and-play calculator from the Center from Disease Control and Prevention crunch the numbers for you.

A salad platter.

A salad platter. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mistake #4: You Avoid Carbs

If you’ve turned your back on carbs, fearing they’ll make you fat, it’s time to put your hat in hand and apologize to them. Carbohydrates don’t make you fat (hint: lettuce—and all other vegetables—are carbs); consuming too many calories does. So if you’re training hard, you most likely want to go heavier on the healthy carbs, given they’re your body’s primary fuel source.

“Body weight can increase after a carbohydrate-rich meal because carbs hold water in the body,” Clark says. “When you carbo-load, for every ounce of carbohydrates you store in your muscle as glycogen, you store about three ounces of water. So when someone eats a bunch of pasta and wakes up the next day feeling like they’ve gained two pounds, they have gained water weight, not fat”

Mistake #5: You Really Love Dressing

We’ve all done it; after pouring our blood, sweat, and tears into making a perfectly balanced salad, the whole operation goes kablooey after we drown it in an inch of dressing.

“Put the dressing in a side dish, dip your fork into the dressing, and then stab a forkful of salad,” she suggests. “You can also dilute the dressing with water, vinegar, or even some milk if it’s a creamy dressing.” Clark adds,”A little bit of dressing on a big salad can be a lot of dressing. Say three tablespoons of dressing is 200 calories. If you have six tablespoons worth of dressing, that’s 400 calories. So if you’re using all of it, you could have had a piece of pizza.”

By Zack Zeigler

via Team Beachbody – Newsletters.